Advanced Humanoid Robots and their Applications

Humanoid Robot

A Robot is any automatically operated machine. In practical usage, a robot is an autonomous or semi-autonomous device that performs its tasks either according to direct human control, partial control with human supervision or completed autonomously. Industrial robots look like pieces of machinery, whereas to be called a humanoid, a robot must meet two main criteria: it has to have a body that resembles a human (head, arms, torso, legs) as well as it has to act like a human in environments specially designed for the capabilities of the human body — like an office or a house.

Advanced Humanoid Robots and their Applications
Advanced Humanoid Robots and their Applications

Since many robots in science fiction look like humans, a humanoid robot may be the default robot for most people. On the other hand, it is difficult to claim that robots should be humanoid robots that are supposed to do some tasks in the real world, considering that aircraft do not look like birds. The required functions for a robot may determine the optimal shape of the robot.

History of Humanoid Robot

The word 'Robot' itself was coined by the Czech playwright Karel Capek from the word robota or forced labor. His play "R.U.R., Rossum's Universal Robots," which premiered in Prague in 1922, was about a factory in the near future where synthetic slaves, or robots, were mass produced for export all over the world. 

Timeline of Humanoid Robot

  • Leonardo da Vinci is known to have created and possibly built his Mechanical Knight in 1495, as evidenced by recently found sketches. In essence, it is a medieval-style armored fighter that moves like a person.
  • 1810: Friedrich Kaufmann of Dresden, Germany, created the first humanoid robot in 1810, which was a soldier holding a trumpet. At the very least, the robot was on display till April 30, 1950.
  • Although the idea of artificial humans predates written history, the word "robot" as we know it today comes from the Czech word "robota," which was used in Karel Apek's play RUR (1920).
  • Herbert Televox, the earliest known humanoid robot, was created in 1927. It was created by Ron Wensley in 1927, and according to the signal it sends out, it has simple actions like lifting the phone to answer a call.
  • Alan Turing developed the Turing test in 1952 to determine if a machine could have an autonomous viewpoint.
  • The WABOT Project was initiated at Waseda University in 1967, and it was finished in 1972. It was the first full-scale humanoid robot ever created. It could move around, carry objects to far-off places, converse with others in Japanese, and walk.
  • After 20 years of development, Honda's Asimo created a robot in 2000 that could walk, jump, etc. AsIMO was the world's most advanced robot at the time. AsIMO's more recent versions are still thought to be some of the most advanced robots on the market. 
  • Nao is a small, 2' tall humanoid robot that is frequently utilized in academic and scientific settings. It was first introduced in 2006 by Aldebaran Robotics. About 5000 nanoparticles are operating in about 50 different nations. Nao is designed to be nice to people and has been given jobs, including assisting in care facilities, company receptions, and even helping autistic youngsters. 
  • NASA and General Motors showed off R2 in 2010. It was the most advanced humanoid robot ever made, and it was made for the Destiny lab on the International Space Station. 
  • Hanson Robotics showed off Sophia in 2016 as the most advanced humanoid robot to date. She was born in Saudi Arabia and has a passport.

Why is Humanoid Robot Important

Let us discuss why humanoid robots are more salient. For specific usage, non-humanoid robots are efficient. But while working alongside humans, there are some features we need to talk about.

First of all, we designed the environment of modern society in such a way that is efficient for humans. For example, the height of a stair, the position of a handrail, the width of a corridor, etc. Suppose a robot with wheels instead of feet cannot use stairs, uneven floors, or narrow passages. It should be more economical to develop humanoid robots than modify the environment.

The second feature should imply a similar effect. Most tools for humans are designed to be used by humans. For example, a chair to sit, a table to eat, a driver's cockpit, etc., are made to be used by humans. A screwdriver or scissors can be operated best by articulated fingers. It is more economical to use humanoid robots than to re-design numerous tools. 

The third feature is entertainment. A robot is easily personified when the robot looks like a human. The further a robot is from a human shape, the fewer humans feel a human in the robot. It is fun to watch a biped humanoid robot dancing, but the dancing of a wheeled robot should be less attractive. A human-like shape is crucial to realize a partner robot that can make us enjoy ourselves.

Some Advanced Humanoid Robots and Usages

ASIMO

ASIMO is a humanoid robot developed in Japan in 2000. ASIMO is the acronym for Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility. The name was chosen in honor of Isaac

ASIMO is a humanoid robot developed in Japan in 2000. ASIMO is the acronym for Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility.

Asimov. ASIMO is 130cm tall and weighs 54 kg. It has a unique ability to recognize moving objects, postures, gestures, sounds, faces, and surroundings. It can also distinguish between faces and voices. It is designed to assist and help people. It can run, dance, hop and play soccer.

Atlas

Atlas, designed by Boston Dynamics, is the most agile and dynamic robot ever

Atlas, designed by Boston Dynamics, is the most agile and dynamic robot ever

made. It can operate both outdoors and inside buildings. Atlas has whole-body dynamic stabilization. It can lift and carry objects like boxes and crates, but its favorite tricks are running, jumping, and doing backflips. Atlas uses 3D-printed parts to give it the strength-to-weight ratio necessary for leaps and somersaults. The latest version of the atlas is a massive improvement from its original version. It is used mainly for research purposes.

Jia Jia

Jia Jia was first displayed at the 2016 World Robot Conference in Beijing, China.

Jia Jia was first displayed at the 2016 World Robot Conference in Beijing, China.

She enthralled the visitors with its unique capabilities. She was developed at the University of Science and Technology of China. It was able to blink and smile throughout the dialogue realistically. It is one of the most human-like robots ever created. It can respond to humans and recognize when someone is taking a picture and make appropriate comments, such as warning not to stand too close for fear of making her face "look fat."

Digit

Digit is designed primarily as a delivery robot made by Starship Robotics. Digit

Digit is designed primarily as a delivery robot made by Starship Robotics. Digit

instead opts for a bipedal design, meaning it walks upright on two legs. The bipedal design allows it to carry out actions like climbing steps while carrying items weighing up to 40 lbs in its arms. In all, it represents a robot that's far more like the walking robots promised to us in science fiction. Digit is approximately the size and shape of an adult human. It can navigate environments semi-autonomously with the help of LIDAR technology and other sensors, and it can carry boxes in its arms up to 40 pounds (18 kilograms) in weight. Agility Robotics says it can be put to various uses, including in logistics, warehouses, telepresence, and industrial inspection.

Pepper

Pepper is a friendly humanoid designed to be a companion in the home and help

Pepper is a friendly humanoid designed to be a companion in the home and helpPepper is a friendly humanoid designed to be a companion in the home and help

customers at retail stores. It talks, gesticulates, and seems determined to make everyone smile. It was the world's first full-scale humanoid to be offered to consumers in 2015. It has an omnidirectional wheeled base, voice and object recognition, and a tablet to display information. It supports twenty languages, including Japanese, English, French, and Spanish.

Kime

The 'Kime' robot is a robotic bartender that can speak a dozen languages, make

The 'Kime' robot is a robotic bartender that can speak a dozen languages, make

incredible cocktails, and has the ability to recognize loyal customers. It was created by the Spanish "food tech" group Macco Robotics. The 5G enabled humanoid robot can work 24 hours a day and aids in this new Covid reality of social distancing.

Nadine

Nadine was created in 2013 by Kokoro, Japan. Nadine can show emotions, speak

Nadine was created in 2013 by Kokoro, Japan. Nadine can show emotions, speak

naturally, understand gestures, and remember and retrieve facts during dialogue sessions. At first, Nadine worked as a Receptionist at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Presently, Nadine is working as a customer service agent at AIA Singapore. She has been trained to handle questions that AIA customers usually ask. She even encourages AIA customers to sign up with the AIA e-care registration portal.

Sophia

Hanson Robotics' most advanced human-like robot, Sophia, was first activated on

Hanson Robotics' most advanced human-like robot, Sophia, was first activated onHanson Robotics' most advanced human-like robot, Sophia, was first activated on

February 14, 2016. Soon after, 'Sophia' sparked controversy since she was given citizenship and has done media performances worldwide. Sophia was named the United Nations Development Programma's first Innovation Champion in 2017. She has appeared in numerous TV shows and Programs. The robot was granted Saudi Arabian Citizenship on October 25, 2017.

Current Usages of Humanoid Robots

Humanoid robots are being used in various applications. Some of them are stated below:

  • Military & Security: Search and rescue, mine/improvised explosive device (IED) handling, and direct weapons use. 
  • Medical: Search and rescue, patient transfer, nursing, elder care, and friendship. 
  • Home service: Cleaning, food preparation, shopping, inventory, and home security. 
  • Space: Working safely with space-walking astronauts and caretakers between crews. 
  • Dangerous jobs: Operating construction equipment, handling cargo, firefighting, and security. 
  • Manufacturing: Small parts assembly, inventory control, delivery, and customer support.
  • Hospitality: Robotic Kios king, Room Servicing, Serving
  • Agriculture: Automated Harvesting, Weeding, Autonomous farming
  • Entertainment: Dance, Sing, News Presenting, Acting What the Future Holds.

What the Future Holds

As we advance towards the future, we look forward to humanoids and robots evolving further and finding broader applications as they become more affordable to the more significant population. Contrary to the belief that robots will take away our jobs, it's fair to say, based on the developments, that humanoids and robots will help automate repetitive jobs. These will allow humans to focus on more complex and creative tasks and create more jobs.

The market for humanoid robots is expected to be worth $3.9 billion in 2023, growing at a CAGR of 52.1 percent between 2017 and 2023. Prediction says that bipedal robots will expand at the fastest CAGR of all humanoid robot types throughout the projection period.

Humanoid robots will answer critical philosophical questions about consciousness, life definitions, morality, emotions, etc. 

Limitations of Humanoid Robots

 While humanoid robots and AI have advanced a lot in recent years, they still have some drawbacks.

Price: Humanoid Robots are not affordable for most people. E.g., The price of the Pepper robot is about $1500 per robot.

Maintenance: Though most robots are somewhat autonomous, they still need supervision and regular maintenance. The cost is also very high.

Unpredictable AI: Despite being intelligent to work in a real environment, a humanoid robot must be safe and secure. Unfortunately, the field of AI Safety is very young, and researchers are still working to identify its main challenges and limitations. 

Security and Data Privacy: As more and more robots are listening to and analyzing data, data privacy concerns also increase exponentially.

Influence of Bias on AI: Since most robots are trained based on data in the real world, the bias that comes with the same also impacts it. The Internet is the knowledge hub, and it is also a very toxic place. Recent research shows that a face recognition algorithm could not detect an African American Woman, with 80% of images being white persons and 75% being male.

Conclusion

Many of us are aware that robotic automation will ultimately disturb our lives. However, we are certain that our livelihoods will remain secure. They aren't. Robotic automation will touch every commercial sector in the next few years. Robotic automation proponents frequently point out that, for the most part, robots cannot operate or program themselves — at least in the near future. Theoretically, this will create new, high-skilled employment for technicians, programmers, and other newly important tasks. Humanoid Robots, with their cutting-edge technology, will assist humans in opening new possibilities in the future.

Despite having some limitations and drawbacks, humanoid robots still hold the candle to a very bright future for humanity.

0/Post a Comment/Comments